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Ewarton High Innovates Sustainable Solutions with WATA Seed Money

Ewarton High Innovates Sustainable Solutions with WATA Seed Money
Ewarton High School is making strides with their newly opened bio-diesel plant. On May 4th,
the rural school was able to successfully open the plant amidst on-lookers from their upper
school community and members of the WATA Sustainability Competition judging panel.
Ewarton begun construction of the bio-diesel plant in March after receiving $100,000 in grant
money from WATA’s sustainability competition. The school entered the contest in the category
of green energy – the competition has a grand prize for the top green energy project and the
top conservation project. Each school received an initial grant to begin the first phase of their
project.
“A lot of students are coming from as far as Moneague and they use the school bus,” said fifth
form student Dammiel Walker. “This project will allow the fare that the students pay to use the
school bus to drop.”
The project is expected to reduce the fuel cost to the school which is currently in excess of
$10,000 per trip. The school hopes to pass on the cost savings to the school community. So far,
local restaurants and fast food chains have played a major role in getting the plant started as
they have contributed over 500 gallons of used vegetable oil to the school.
Students at Ewarton played a major role in the completion of the bio-diesel plant as they
assisted with construction, welding, electrical installation and more. Students in the upper
school will be responsible for the operation of the bio-diesel plant under the supervision of the
school’s chemistry teachers. “With the push for math and science for students in Jamaica
presently, I am hoping to inspire some of our students at Ewarton to look closer at the field of
science and engineering,” said Alton Scott, the schools chair person. “Since construction, we
find that students are asking more questions – we get that kind of interest with students
wanting to know how the system works.”
Other projects in the WATA Sustainability Competition which have been debuted include
Jonothan Grant’s solar powered green house, McGrath High’s plastic bottle greenhouse and
Charlemont’s rain harvesting system which will water their farms. The top schools from the
Green Energy and Conservation categories will receive an additional $750,000 each.

Ewarton High School is making strides with their newly opened bio-diesel plant. On May 4th,
the rural school was able to successfully open the plant amidst on-lookers from their upper
school community and members of the WATA Sustainability Competition judging panel.
Ewarton begun construction of the bio-diesel plant in March after receiving $100,000 in grant
money from WATA’s sustainability competition. The school entered the contest in the category
of green energy – the competition has a grand prize for the top green energy project and the
top conservation project. Each school received an initial grant to begin the first phase of their
project.
“A lot of students are coming from as far as Moneague and they use the school bus,” said fifth
form student Dammiel Walker. “This project will allow the fare that the students pay to use the
school bus to drop.”
The project is expected to reduce the fuel cost to the school which is currently in excess of
$10,000 per trip. The school hopes to pass on the cost savings to the school community. So far,
local restaurants and fast food chains have played a major role in getting the plant started as
they have contributed over 500 gallons of used vegetable oil to the school.
Students at Ewarton played a major role in the completion of the bio-diesel plant as they
assisted with construction, welding, electrical installation and more. Students in the upper
school will be responsible for the operation of the bio-diesel plant under the supervision of the
school’s chemistry teachers. “With the push for math and science for students in Jamaica
presently, I am hoping to inspire some of our students at Ewarton to look closer at the field of
science and engineering,” said Alton Scott, the schools chair person. “Since construction, we
find that students are asking more questions – we get that kind of interest with students
wanting to know how the system works.”
Other projects in the WATA Sustainability Competition which have been debuted include
Jonothan Grant’s solar powered green house, McGrath High’s plastic bottle greenhouse and
Charlemont’s rain harvesting system which will water their farms. The top schools from the
Green Energy and Conservation categories will receive an additional $750,000 each.